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Disney’s Animal Kingdom Baby Elephant Corra Makes Her Kilimanjaro Safari Debut (Disney Images & Video)

Baby Elephant Corra Makes Her Debut to Guests at Disney’s Animal Kingdom

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (Feb. 15, 2024) – With hundreds of guests awaiting her appearance, 2-month-old African elephant Corra made her debut today at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Theme Park, boosting efforts to save this majestic and endangered species.   

Wide-eyed baby Corra is 312-pounds and stays close to mom Nadirah while exploring her new surroundings at Kilimanjaro Safaris. Born in December at Animal Kingdom and standing a little more than 3 feet tall, Corra joins three generations of female elephants living together, one of the few herds living together at a facility accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA).  

With hundreds of guests awaiting her appearance, 2-month-old African elephant Corra made her debut today at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Theme Park at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Bennett Stoops, photographer)

“With this birth, and every birth, we are sustaining a healthy population of elephants to help protect the species and share their story with millions of guests from around the world,” said Scott Terrell, D.V.M. Director of Animal & Science Operations for Disney Experiences. 

 
Corra’s mother Nadirah was also born at Animal Kingdom, making Corra the first second-generation elephant in Animal Kingdom’s history. Nadirah’s little sister Stella, born in 2016, has passed on the title of youngest elephant on the safari. Between Stella and her other aunt Luna and grandmother Donna, Corra has plenty of role models to learn from and strong family bonds.   

With hundreds of guests awaiting her appearance, 2-month-old African elephant Corra made her debut today at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Theme Park at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Bennett Stoops, photographer)

The 22-month Pregnancy   

Getting to the big day was nearly two years in the making. It started with the animal care team and our endocrinologists noticing Nadirah’s new behaviors and maturity, indicating she might be ready to become a mom. After some hopeful introductions and a successful courtship, a match was made with Mac.  
 
Throughout her pregnancy, Nadirah had regular ultrasounds to make sure mom and baby were healthy. Nadirah voluntarily participated in her own care and keepers made sure she was comfortable every step of her pregnancy. The animal care and endocrinology teams carefully monitored the final stages of Nadirah’s nearly 22-month pregnancy, measuring the calf’s size, weight and mom’s hormones daily. A drop in progesterone levels was a sure sign that Corra’s arrival was close. 
With hundreds of guests awaiting her appearance, 2-month-old African elephant Corra made her debut today at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Theme Park at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Bennett Stoops, photographer)

The Unsung Heroes Behind Baby Corra  
 
From timing maturity levels and coordinating introductions of mom Nadirah and dad Mac, to observing mating behaviors, monitoring hormonal cycles and the big labor and delivery day – the science behind the birth of a baby animal at Disney is facilitated by an orchestra of unsung heroes who quietly work behind the scenes and go to incredible lengths to ensure the genetic diversity and healthy population of endangered species. 
 
In fact, the animal care team has welcomed a range of endangered and threatened species to Walt Disney World in collaboration with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan. These efforts have helped many species at Animal Kingdom including African elephants, Sumatran tigers, western lowland gorillas, tiny cotton-top tamarins and the elusive okapi to name just a few.  

As a part of Disney’s Planet Possible commitment to create a happier, healthier planet for all and funding from The Walt Disney Company, supplemented by the generous contributions of guests, the Disney Conservation Fund has invested more than $125 million in conservation efforts that have supported more than 1,000 species and protected 315 million acres globally since 1995. 

Two more baby elephants are expected at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in 2025.  

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